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Unlocking the Human Potential for Public Sector Performance   

Unlocking the Human Potential for Public Sector Performance

World Public Sector Report 2005

UNITED NATIONS 

This work is published for and on behalf of the United Nations.

Paper  Back Book   :   Pages : 141
2006  Edition         :   ISBN - 81-7188-522-5
Price : Rs. 495.00  
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ABOUT THE BOOK :

The conditions of globalization, including economic integration, fiscal discipline, introduction of information communications technologies and democratic governance, have increasingly forced states to redefine their role in public management and to reform the public administration system. However, there is growing realization amongst decision makers that policy and institutional reform per se will not be sufficient to revitalize the public sector. Major strengthening of the knowledge, skills, values, attitudes and leadership abilities of human capital is also needed to transform the public sector, particularly in developing countries and countries with economies in transition. This year's Report is expected to contribute to global and national debates on this important topic.


CONTENTS IN DETAIL :

Foreword

Preface 

Acknowledgements

Executive summary 

Explanatory notes

 

Towards an Impartial, Professional and Responsive Public Service

Introduction

 

I.

The globalization of public sector reform

The changing role of public administration

Traditional public administration

Public management

Responsive governance

Emerging issues

The resilience of traditional civil service values

Public administration: responsive to whom?

Responsiveness to politicians

Responsiveness to citizens and customers

Towards a new synthesis

 

II.

Human resource management and government performance

Why HRM matters

The importance of merit-oriented HRM policies

Government as a “model employer”

HRM reform: “starting from where you find yourself”

Reform requires sound political diagnosis

Leadership commitment is necessary

 

III.

Socio-economic challenges facing HRM

Demographic changes

Shortage of skilled labour 

Labour migration 

Potential benefits of labour migration 

HIV/AIDS 

Managing in an HIV/AIDS environment

 

IV.

The mixed results of HRM reform

Structural adjustment and downsizing

New public management: lessons learned

Outsourcing: a double-edged sword

Performance-related pay: an unwarranted panacea?

NPM: more than a doctrine

Leap-frogging: a possibility?

Labour relations in the public service

Diversity management

Gender imbalance

Accommodating diversity

 

V.

Managing people as a strategic resource

Adopting a holistic approach to reform

Building an effective HRM institutional framework

Legal and regulatory reform

Central government: assigning the HRM leadership role

Central and line agencies: establishing the division of HRM responsibility

Professionalizing human resource management

HRM units: towards strategic specialization 

Competence frameworks: setting the standard for performance 

Merit-based appointment: getting the best person for the job 

Developing a pay policy: attracting and retaining talent 

Performance management and appraisal: supporting and developing staff

Rightsizing: getting staffing back on track 

 

VI.

Promoting organizational learning in the public service

Organizational culture: changing mindsets 

Compliance: a virtue turned vice 

Organizational learning: a people-centred framework

Strategic areas to promote organizational learning 

Improve knowledge-sharing and management 

Promote mentoring programmes for staff 

Enhance the analytical capacity of government 

Strengthen the career development system 

Leadership as the facilitator of learning 

 

Technical summary: Public sector performance, prestige and promotion

Public sector performance

Prestige of a public sector career 

Promotion to high-level political posts

 

Bibliography

Boxes

1.

Information and communication technologies

2.

UN/DESA analysis of government performance

3.

Political discretion in reform—Benin

4.

Old age, new challenges—China

5.

Pension reform for a sustainable future—Brazil

6.

Turning brain drain into brain gain—Philippines

7.

Stemming the brain drain—South Africa

8.

The impact of HIV/AIDS on the public service—Malawi

9.

Outsourcing public services: the National Health Service—United Kingdom

10.

Performance-related pay: if you fail to prepare, you prepare to fail—Mauritius

11.

The Public Service Modernization Act—Canada

12.

The role of ICTs in facilitating decentralized HRM—Cameroon

13.

A voluntary retirement scheme—India

14.

Rightsizing the right way—Uruguay

15.

Developing a shared vision—Germany

16.

Leading by example—Namibia

Figures

1.

Driving and restraining forces in Moroccan reform

2.

Ten developing countries with highest emigration rates of highly educated people to OECD countries, 1999–2001

3.

Ten largest developing-country recipients of remittances, 2002

4.

Ten developing countries with largest ratios of remittances to GDP, 2002

5.

Ten developing countries with highest proportion of adults living with HIV, 2003

6.

Ten developing countries with the most adults living with HIV, 2003

7.

Central government expenditure on wages in 49 developing countries, 1980–1999

8.

Decision-makers one level below that of minister in the central administration of 30 European countries, by gender, 2004

9.

Decision-makers two levels below that of minister in the central administration of 30 European countries, by gender, 2004

Scatter plots

1.

Bureaucratic quality and merit

2.

Integrity and merit

3.

Bureaucratic quality and salary

4.

Integrity and salary

5.

Prestige and new public management

Tables

1.

Three models of public administration

2.

Six forms of accountability

3.

Approaches for different stages of HRM reform

4.

Composition of Chad’s civil service, 2002

5.

Selected HRM features of the three models of public administration

6.

Responsibility for HRM in central government agencies

7.

A competence framework for HRM

8.

Selected pay-scale compression ratios, 1991–2003

9.

Wages and salaries in federal versus unitary states
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